Humanity’s Mass Extinction of Wildlife Continues

“Species population declines are especially pronounced in the tropics, with South and Central America suffering the most dramatic decline, an 89 percent loss compared to 1970,” reads the report. “Freshwater species numbers have also declined dramatically, with the Freshwater Index showing an 83% decline since 1970.” Continue reading

Helping Wildlife Survive the Sixth Mass Extinction

The best habitats for wildlife, the ones along streams, in deep shaded canyons, and those in areas of diverse topography will sustain more wildlife as climate changes. Preserving those habitats is an essential goal for wildlife conservation. Continue reading

Should We Look on the Bright Side of the 6th Mass Extinction? – Animalista Untamed

“. . . I’m afraid I cannot echo the Professor’s optimism. The future of the Earth he foresees where only the toughest few survive is a planet desperately diminished in richness and complexity. Species at threat right now have their own unique and vital roles within the complex web of life. We do not know all the ways their loss will impair our own survival. But we do know we will lose our delight, our constant surprise at their dazzling beauty, their awesome abilities, from the humblest woodlouse to the blue whale, king of the oceans.
“Above all, they too have a right to their life and a place to live it, untrammelled and free.” –Animalista Untamed. Continue reading

World’s Forests Are Fragmenting Into Tiny Patches, Risking Mass Extinctions

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/31640-world-s-forests-are-fragmenting-into-tiny-patches-risking-mass-extinctions 30 June 2015 09:18 Written by? David Edwards By David Edwards, The Conversation Much of the Earth was once cloaked in vast forests, from the subarctic snowforests to the Amazon and Congo…

Half-way to Catastrophe — Global Hothouse Extinction to be Triggered by or Before 2100 Without Rapid Emissions Cuts

Presently, human beings are dumping carbon into the atmosphere at an extremely high rate of around 11 billion tons per year. Today, about 2.6 billion tons per year of this carbon ends up in the ocean. In total, since 1850, humans have added about 155 billion tons of carbon to the Earth’s oceans — leaving us with about another 155 billion tons before Rothman’s (the study author) extinction threshold is crossed. Continue reading