About Garry Rogers

An advocate for wildlife and nature conservation, I write about plants, animals, and natural landscapes.  My experiences with the vegetation ecology of North American deserts, forests, and coasts have made it clear that disastrous changes are occurring. I write and blog to draw attention to what’s going on and encourage others to join in the defense of nature. Here’s a summary of my curriculum vitae.

Experience

  • BRR Enterprises.– Partner
  • University of Utah.– PhD Candidate, Teaching Fellow
  • InterScience, Inc. –Director
  • Columbia University in the City of New York. –Professor, Department of Geography
  • U. S. Forest Service. –Senior Research Scientist
  • U. S. Justice Department. –Science Consultant
  • Academic Distributing, Inc. –Founder, CEO
  • Agua Fria Chamber of Commerce. –Founder, President
  • Agua Fria Open Space Alliance, Inc. –Founder, President
  • Southern Yavapai Water Users Association. –Founder, President
  • Universal Life Church. –Ordained Minister (non-religious weddings only)
  • Books and Monographs. —Then & Now, Bibliography of Repeat Photography, Arizona Wildlife Notebook, Vol I: The Vertebrates, Corr Syl the Warrior, Arizona Wildlife Notebook, Corr Syl the Terrible, Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, The H. sapiens Problem, Butterflies of Yavapai County, Arizona, Weeds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona. 

Poirot the Parrot

Trib Photo/Briana Lonas Children's author Garry Rogers reads from his book about an adventurous parrot during the Local Authors Book Festival in Prescott Valley.

Garry reading a Poirot story at the 2015 Prescott Valley Local Authors Book Festival (Trib photo/Briana Lonas).

When my daughter was small, I told her stories about a foolish young parrot named Poirot (Pwä-rōw).  A few years ago I began compiling a set of the stories for her and my son to read to their children.  I found that retelling the stories helped make them more interesting.  It is best to do this at bedtime when children will do anything to avoid going to sleep.  Here’s the link to a PDF copy of Bees and Birthday Cake–How Poirot Lost a Tail Feather.

 Garry Rogers Honors

More than just reporting my awards, I wish to honor the institutions that take time to evaluate the work of so many like me in an effort to encourage their productivity.

Kirkus Star: Awarded to books of exceptional merit.Kirkus Star awarded to Corr Syl the Warrior.  “A beautifully written novel that will captivate sci-fi fans of all ages.”  —Kirkus reviews. –June, 2013.

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OneBookAZ LogoCorr Syl the Warrior Winner of the Arizona State Library 2014 OneBookAZ Teen Literature Award.

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Award NM-AZ 2014 WinnerArizona Wildlife Notebook winner of the New Mexico–Arizona 2014 Book Awards

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 SigmaXi

SigmaXi The Scientific Research Society.  Elected to Full Membership (lifetime).

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1-PX Coll Alum Hall of Fame Medal 001

Phoenix College Alumni Hall of Fame – 2014.

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Recent Posts

Yikes! Stinknet is Here!

Stinknet Has Reached Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona

Yesterday (June 14, 2019), I discovered a new invasive weed growing in Humboldt. The plant’s small yellow flowers caught my attention as I walked along Old Black Canyon Highway. Roads are common dispersal routes for invading weeds. First the roadsides, next the yards and hillsides.

Stinknet (Oncosiphon piluliferum), an invasive desert weed.

The first thought produced by Stinknet is that its bright yellow flowers are beautiful. The next thought, however, is that something stinks. Stinknet produces resinous sap that smells like a rotten pineapple. The odor plus the tendency for the plants to grow in tight formation create real impediments to outdoor activity. Even worse, Stinknet is a strong competitor that replaces native plants. But worse still, the plants are highly flammable and encourage destructive wildfires. If Stinknet invades, the quality of natural habitats will decline and many soil organisms, native plants, and native animals will disappear.

Stinknet is spreading across the hot deserts of California and Arizona. I’ve known about the weed since 2008 when Andrew Salywon of the Phoenix Botanical Garden ranked it as one of four weeds posing the greatest threats to Agua Fria National Monument 20mi south of Humboldt. The plant has not been reported above 2300ft in Arizona, and I assumed that at 4500ft, Lonesome Valley winters would be too cold for Stinknet. I did not even include it in the list of possible future weeds in Weeds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona. Let’s hope that other dangerous weeds that I did not list will not reach Lonesome Valley.

Stinknet is a member of the Sunflower family. It’s small round yellow flower heads are composed of 100 to 250 flowers packed into a ball no more than 1cm (1/2in) in diameter (Copyright 2019, Garry Rogers).

Stinknet is a small plant rarely more than 2ft tall. This plant is about 6 1/2in (Copyright 2019, Garry Rogers).

 

Treatment: How to Control Stinknet

Though people have carried Stinknet thousands of miles from its South African home, and though the plant has dispersed rapidly along Arizona highways, Stinknet may not survive and spread in Dewey-Humboldt. However, that’s not a safe bet. Like medical doctors, weed professionals practice EDRR (Early Detection Rapid Response). Now’s the time to begin watching for the plant along the highway and town streets. At this early point in Stinknet’s invasion of Dewey-Humboldt, the best control tactic is pulling and bagging the complete plant including the roots. If the plant spreads, control will become much more difficult and expensive. Like any disease, weed invasions are easier to cure when discovered early.

Stinknet (Copyright Max Licher).

Identification

Stinknet (Oncosiphon piluliferum) Daisy Family—ASTERACEAE.
Annual with persistent roots. Small, less than 2ft tall. One to five or more thin stems arising from base, sparse alternate leaves, striking yellow flowers in small tight balls less than 10mm diameter. Stinky.

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