About Garry Rogers

An advocate for wildlife and nature conservation, I write about plants, animals, and natural landscapes.  My experiences with the vegetation ecology of North American deserts, forests, and coasts have made it clear that disastrous changes are occurring. I write and blog to draw attention to what’s going on and encourage others to join in the defense of nature. Here’s a summary of my curriculum vitae.

Experience

  • BRR Enterprises.– Partner
  • University of Utah.– PhD Candidate, Teaching Fellow
  • InterScience, Inc. –Director
  • Columbia University in the City of New York. –Professor, Department of Geography
  • U. S. Forest Service. –Senior Research Scientist
  • U. S. Justice Department. –Science Consultant
  • Academic Distributing, Inc. –Founder, CEO
  • Agua Fria Chamber of Commerce. –Founder, President
  • Agua Fria Open Space Alliance, Inc. –Founder, President
  • Southern Yavapai Water Users Association. –Founder, President
  • Universal Life Church. –Ordained Minister (non-religious weddings only)
  • Agua Fria Investments, LLC. –Chief Administrative Officer
  • Books and Monographs. —Then & Now, Bibliography of Repeat Photography, Arizona Wildlife Notebook, Vol I: The Vertebrates, Corr Syl the Warrior, Arizona Wildlife Notebook, Corr Syl the Terrible, Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, The H. sapiens Problem, Butterflies of Yavapai County, Arizona, Weeds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, Desert Weeds. 

Poirot the Parrot

Trib Photo/Briana Lonas Children's author Garry Rogers reads from his book about an adventurous parrot during the Local Authors Book Festival in Prescott Valley.

Garry reading a Poirot story at the 2015 Prescott Valley Local Authors Book Festival (Trib photo/Briana Lonas).

When my daughter was small, I told her stories about a foolish young parrot named Poirot (Pwä-rōw).  A few years ago I began compiling a set of the stories for her and my son to read to their children.  I found that retelling the stories helped make them more interesting.  It is best to do this at bedtime when children will do anything to avoid going to sleep.  Here’s the link to a PDF copy of Bees and Birthday Cake–How Poirot Lost a Tail Feather.

 Garry Rogers Honors

More than just reporting my awards, I wish to honor the institutions that take time to evaluate the work of so many like me in an effort to encourage their productivity.

Kirkus Star: Awarded to books of exceptional merit.Kirkus Star awarded to Corr Syl the Warrior.  “A beautifully written novel that will captivate sci-fi fans of all ages.”  —Kirkus reviews. –June, 2013.

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OneBookAZ LogoCorr Syl the Warrior Winner of the Arizona State Library 2014 OneBookAZ Teen Literature Award.

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Award NM-AZ 2014 WinnerArizona Wildlife Notebook winner of the New Mexico–Arizona 2014 Book Awards

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 SigmaXi

SigmaXi The Scientific Research Society.  Elected to Full Membership (lifetime).

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1-PX Coll Alum Hall of Fame Medal 001

Phoenix College Alumni Hall of Fame – 2014.

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Recent Posts

Avoiding Oligarchy to Preserve Nature

Cherokee Nation Seal

Cherokee Nation Seal

The Cherokee Tribe is a sovereign nation with rights guaranteed by a treaty ratified by the U. S. Congress and signed by the U. S. President. The Tribe’s relationship with the United  States is similar to that of the 50 states. The following article by Chuck Hoskin, Jr. Cherokee Principal Chief, concerns the tribe’s efforts to control the corrupting influence of dark money on elected members of the tribal government. I’ve posted it here for the edification of American voters and the U.S. Congress where money is being used by special interests to legally bribe congressional members. Allowed to continue, this could replace our representative government with an oligarchic government.
In my limited experience, it appears that oligarchs have no respect for nature and see natural systems only as resources to harvest. It seems that a representative government is more likely to take action to save the Earth from our current rampant growth and quest for wealth and power. Here’s what Chief Hoskin says:

“Dark money corrupts. Democracy dies in the dark. But, the sovereign government of the Cherokee Nation Reservation is fighting back with recent election law reforms that demand transparency.
“Let us start with the facts: Our longstanding election laws require transparency and accountability with respect to campaign donations. Donation limits, mandatory disclosure and prohibition against “independent expenditures” are all hedges against corruption embedded in Cherokee law. I believe our campaign finance laws were among the strongest in the country even before the latest reforms.
“But, the 2019 election exposed some weaknesses in our laws. It is true that a candidate in 2019 was disqualified for illegally coordinating with an illegal entity operated by non-Indians out of Oklahoma City. Public hearings, including by our Supreme Court, disclosed this attempt to cheat and to steal an election by a group called “Cherokees for Change.” The law held one lawbreaker accountable. However, the law left many involved in the illegal scheme unscathed.
“The law did not hold accountable the people who funneled an unknown amount of money into the election. We may never know the full extent of the corruption, who made donations and what they hoped to gain from their scheme. Perhaps these same outside interests are regrouping to again try to buy our elections. Perhaps others are circling the Cherokee Nation with the same plans.
“The Council of the Cherokee Nation recently took action after literally years of careful review of our election code. I proposed, and the council enacted, the country’s strongest ban on dark money. The law passed 15-0, with two councilors absent. Deputy Speaker Victoria Vazquez said she sponsored the legislation so that “people, not outside corporate interests, control our democracy.” She is spot on.
“I proudly signed the reforms into law earlier this month alongside Deputy Chief Bryan Warner. The law reinforces the ban on the kind of anonymous and unlimited piles of cash that illegally poured into our 2019 elections from Oklahoma City. But, the law now punishes those who donate to these illegal entities with stiff criminal and civil penalties.
“As Council Speaker Mike Shambaugh said, “The message we are sending today is that this is not 2019; you won’t get away with corruption.”
“The ban on dark money is a true exercise of our tribal sovereignty and a win for government transparency. While other nations may be content with unlimited, unregulated, anonymous campaign contributions, the Cherokee Nation is not. Sixteen of 17 council members expressed support for this basic idea: The Cherokee people deserve to know who is contributing to candidates for public office.
“As I reflect on our Nation’s bold stand against corruption, my thoughts turn to the current election campaigns in Oklahoma. Recently, I pushed back on politicians in Oklahoma who are claiming Cherokee sovereignty is “the greatest threat” and that our reservations should be “disestablished.” A number of powerful politicians seem to fear Cherokee Nation making its own laws and protecting the public interest.
“From the perspective of anti-Indian politicians, maybe our sovereignty is a threat. It is certainly a threat to the corrupt influence of those who would try to secretly buy our elections.
chief-hoskin“I firmly believe that some of the same anti-Indian interests who want to destroy our reservations are busy hatching a “plan B” to try to control tribal governments. The Cherokee people and their representatives will not stand for it. No wonder some of these anti-sovereignty politicians are scared.
“We are sovereign. The Cherokee people demand transparency. The days of corrupt dark money in Cherokee politics are over” Chuck Hoskin, Jr., Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation.

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