Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona Wins Gold

Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona Wins Literary Classics Gold

July 1, 2017 –Literary Classics International Youth Book Awards (LC) announced award winners today. LC previously awarded Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona the LC Seal of Approval. Today the book was honored with the LC Gold Award.

“Literary Classics, an organization dedicated to furthering excellence in literature for young readers, takes great pride in its role to help promote literature which appeals to youth while educating and encouraging positive values in the impressionable young minds of future generations.”

Literary Classics Awards Ceremony

This year, Literary Classics International presents awards on Sunday September 3, 2017. The awards event includes a round-table discussion for authors, a writers’ conference, book signing, and authors’ reception in conjunction with the Great American Book Festival.

Excerpt and Book Details

The past decade’s droughts, storms, and spreading deserts show that humanity is changing the Earth. Research coming from many sources shows that worldwide animal extinctions are occurring 100 times faster than in Earth’s previous mass-extinction events recorded in the fossil record.

Extinction isn’t the only concern. Total loss of a species results after years of decline. The Living Planet Index, which measures abundance levels of 14,152 monitored populations of 3,706 vertebrate species, shows that a worldwide crash is occurring. On average, monitored species declined by 58% between 1970 and 2012.

Loggerhead Shrike

Loggerhead Shrike

One of the oldest and most familiar citizen-participation activities is the Audubon Society’s Christmas Bird Count. Wildlife biologists have used the Bird Count to monitor bird species populations. A recent analysis of the Count’s results show that many U.S. bird species are declining. Some of our most familiar birds appear in current counts less than half as often as they did just 50 years ago. For example, over the past 50 years, sightings of Loggerhead Shrikes, a common Arizona species, declined by 72%. The Shrike in the photograph at left is the only one I have seen in 19 years of watching at my place.

Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) wildlife biologists conclude that at least 58% of Arizona’s native birds are definitely declining and . Another 20% are of possible long-term concern. The U.S. Endangered Species Act protects only 1% of Arizona bird species.

The reason for the declining numbers is not a mystery. Researchers have shown that the declines are due to the impact of human activities, chiefly:

  • habitat destruction (building and farming)
  • resource harvests (logging, livestock grazing, and water diversion)
  • habitat deterioration caused by introduced invasive plants
  • habitat poisoning with pesticides, toxic wastes, and in the case of the oceans, acidification due to CO2 increases and increases in organic runoff from the land.

The human impact is a direct result of human construction, land clearing, and resource consumption. Our total global population is nearing 7.5 billion and we are using the Earth’s renewable resources faster than natural processes replenish them.

Unless we control our population and consumption or unless drought, disease, pollution, and rising temperature control them for us, the environmental impacts of our growth will eventually eliminate upwards of 80% of our bird species.

I believe nature conservation was the great challenge of the 20th Century, and we failed the challenge. Human beings are imposing a mass extinction that now appears destined to wipe out most animals on Earth. I hope readers of this book will recognize the danger and help me find ways to stop the extinctions.

Bird Species Numbers

According to the information published by AZGFD, 551 bird species and subspecies occur in Arizona. Regular residents number 451.

  • World estimate: 10,000
  • U.S. estimate: 1,000
  • Arizona total: 551
  • Arizona birds regularly present: 451
  • Arizona regulars of concern (S1 to S3): 260 (58%)
  • Arizona regulars of possible long-term concern (S4): 95 (21%).
  • ESA Arizona regulars listed endangered: 6 (1%)
  • ESA Arizona regulars listed threatened: 1 (<1%)
  • ESA Arizona regulars of concern: 26 (6%)

Book Details

  • Title:               Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona
  • Pages:           128
  • Identifiers: ISBN 978-1539511786 | LCCN 2016918263
  • Subjects: LCSH Dewey-Humboldt (Ariz.) | Agua Fria River Valley (Ariz.) | Birds–Arizona. | BISAC NATURE / Birdwatching Guides
  • Classification: LCC QL684.A6 .R63 2016 | DDC 598.09791–dc23
  • Download a FREE PDF copy.
  • List Price:       $24.95
  • Description:  This book describes the birds seen around the author’s home in the center of Dewey-Humboldt, a small Arizona town. A desert stream, the Agua Fria River, passes through the town and across land owned by the author. There, the river flood plain supports a 20-acre willow-cottonwood forest. Without houses or trails in its core area, the forest is a safe zone for wildlife. Thousands of birds belonging to more than 100 species stop to rest and forage in the small forest. The Southwest Willow Flycatcher (on the U. S. Endangered Species List) and several other rare bird species use the forest to build nests and raise families. The book lists 127 species observed in and around the forest. For each, the book includes seasonal abundance, conservation status, and a photograph.
  • Reviews
  • Purchase from:
  • Independent bookstores with books in stock
    • Gifts and Games, Humboldt Station, Humboldt, AZ, (928) 227-2775
    • Other bookstores can order the book from their distributor.
  • Internet

 

 

Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona Awarded Literary Classics Seal of Approval

Birds of Dewey-Humboldt Receives Literary Classics Seal of Approval

Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona just received the Literary Classics Seal of Approval (CLC). When the book appeared, I called on readers to watch for errors since I had made the questionable decision to edit the work myself. The CLC Seal suggests that errors were below the ‘intolerable’ threshold.

The book is a finalist for top honors to be announced July 1.

“June 27, 2017. Literary Classics is pleased to announce that the book Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, by Garry Rogers, has received the Literary Classics Seal of Approval. The CLC Seal of Approval is a designation reserved for those books which uphold the rigorous criteria set forth by the Literary Classics review committee, a team of individuals with backgrounds in publishing, editing, writing, illustration and graphic design.” –Literary Classics.

“Literary Classics, an organization dedicated to furthering excellence in literature for young readers, takes great pride in its role to help promote literature which appeals to youth while educating and encouraging positive values in the impressionable young minds of future generations. To learn more about Literary Classics, you may visit their website at http://www.clcawards.org or http://www.childrensliteraryclassics.com.&#8221;

‘The H. sapiens Problem’ Print Edition is Available

“The H. sapiens Problem” by Garry Rogers

The print edition of ‘The H. sapiens Problem’ is available. Here’s how it starts:

front-cover

Prolog

Why didn’t intelligence appear in Earth’s first complex creatures during the Proterozoic a billion years ago?

What if it did?

Life in the Proterozoic:  Waves from a passing pancake-shaped oblate spheroid shake two small cigar-shaped prolate spheroids with long fine flagellates. One Pro-sphere waves its flags with a question for the other:

“Know why the Obo-spheres can’t tell a joke?”

“No, why?”

“Everything they say is sooo flat.”

Jiggles.

Plot

A conflict driven by greed and an ancient grudge ensnares Corr Syl and Rhya Bright, two beautiful young warriors descended from rabbits. Humans from a neighboring city become violent and local authorities ask the two warriors to investigate. Along the way, readers meet a truly evil spider (with spider shape), witness Corr Syl’s clumsy comedic aspirations, endure silly games by other warriors, and wonder at Rhya Bright’s enthusiasm for wrecking enemies who happen along. They will also meet Z99, an intelligent warship whose quantum manipulations of dark energy allow travel through the multiverse.

Characters

  • Corr Syl and Rhya Bright are rabbit descendants and members of Earth’s global multi-species Tsaeb civilization. Like all Tsaeb, Corr and Rhya are beneficiaries of millions of years of natural evolution, scientific advance, and social development. They have internal control over their bodies down to and including their genes. Their mental control is highly advanced as well, but experiencing love, perceiving beauty, and choosing life’s directions remain the uncertain outcomes of experience and nature just as they do for one of civilization’s newest species, Homo sapiens.
    Corr and Rhya have trained as warriors, an uncommon specialty infused with knowledge developed during Earth’s post-dinosaur Age of War. Though still highly respected, warriors have faded from importance in the peaceful world of the Tsaeb. Unusual childhood experiences influenced Corr and Rhya’s decision to become warriors. However, Corr also dreams of becoming a comedian, next to warrior, the most honored profession, and Rhya is studying human psychology. These secondary interests illustrate the allure of those things we do not understand and for which we have no talent–awkward times ahead.
  • Z-99 is an intelligent warship that Corr discovers mothballed in an old museum.
  • Lactella is a Black Widow spider whose evil nature causes trouble through the entire story.
  • Ivan Johns is a human infested and controlled by Lactella.
  • Aaron Li and Ya Zhōu are typical human leaders (so you know what to expect).
  • Others:  Numerous members of the Tsaeb civilization play their parts. All but the birds have human shape. All retain the original skin covering: the fur, feathers, and coloring of their ancestors.

Story Provenance — Corr Syl Stories Merged

The principal conflict in the earlier books, ‘Warrior’ and ‘Terrible’, is between the Tsaeb and the human species. I considered spinning off stand-alone Tsaeb stories, but I was more interested in developing the Tsaeb civilization as a mirror for human nature. ‘Terrible’ is not really an independent story. It is the concluding chapter in the Tsaeb-human conflict. In fact, reviewers said that ‘Terrible’ was difficult to follow without first having read ‘Warrior’. Thus, it seemed best to rewrite and unify the stories. ‘The H. sapiens Problem’, has fewer slow spots and more character detail. It concludes with the revelation that two warring alien species are approaching Earth. Given a chance, either will consume our planet, leaving nothing behind. I have always loved space opera. The next book has space ships, grand starry vistas, and desperate flights across the cosmos.

Whoopee!

WHOOPEE!

Print Details

  • Publication Date:  Jan 3, 2017
  • Publisher:  Coldwater Press – (928) 925-7191 – PO Box 1011, Humboldt, AZ  86329
  • ISBN-13: 9781541157187
  • ISBN-10: 1541157184
  • Size:  6.0″ x 9.0″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm),
    88,300 words, 390 pages
  • Print Identifiers:
  •          ISBN-13:  978-1541157187
  •          LCCN: 2016921063
  •          ISBN-10: 1541157184
  •          BISAC:  Juvenile Fiction / Science Fiction
  • Subjects: LCSH Environmental protection–Fiction. | Conservation of natural resources–Fiction. | Human ecology–Fiction. | Environmentalism–Fiction. | Science fiction. | BISAC JUVENILE FICTION / Science Fiction.
  • Classification: LCC PZ7 .R633 Hs 2017 | DDC [Fic]–dc23
  • Audience:  Teens
  • Price:         $21.95
  • Available everywhere, including Gifts and Games in Humboldt, Arizona (928-227-2775).

eBook Details

  • Publication Date:  Dec. 7, 2016
  • Publisher:  Amazon/Coldwater Press
  • Size:  3499 KB, 88,000 words
  • ASIN: B01N6EOQ1T
  • Audience:  Teens
  • Price:  $ 2.99
  • Available from Amazon.com

Story Provenance

The principal conflict in the earlier books, Warrior and Terrible, is between the Tsaeb and the irresponsible human species. I considered spinning off stand-alone Tsaeb stories, but I was more interested in developing the Tsaeb future. Thus,Terrible is not really an independent story. It is the concluding chapter in the Tsaeb-human conflict. In fact, reviewers said that “Terrible” was difficult to follow without first having read “Warrior.” So, all in all, it seemed best to rewrite and unify the stories. I removed some of the slow spots, added some character details, resolved the conflict, and set up the approaching confrontation with two alien species, a confrontation that humans must face along with the rest of the Tsaeb in a struggle to survive a massive onslaught by two advanced alien species.  I have always loved space opera. So, the next book will have space ships, grand starry vistas, and desperate flights across the cosmos.

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Just Announced: “Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona” Won the AAA Book Festival

Winner for the Birds

winner2

AAA Festival

CHICAGO, IL, November 11, 2016. Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona was just announced the winner of the Animals, Animals, Animals Book Festival.

I sent a draft of my book to the Animals Book Festival and it won! It seemed like a long shot, but you never know. The book won in the birds category. The award ceremony is in Chicago on December 3.