Deforestation: $906B At Risk Via ‘Domino Effect’ On The Supply Chain

GR:  Awareness of the coming disaster is creeping up on the perpetrators. Forecasters predicted an economic decline long ago. It results from the careless treatment of the elements of natural ecosystems as commodities and from the short-sighted business imperative of “growth at all costs.”  Read more here.

“No wonder Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) risk has lain hidden for so long. Now that businesses are regularly being encouraged to look closer at their supply chains and disclose it, the implications are alarming: for businesses, investors and the planet. A new study released today reveals that, on average nearly a quarter (24%) of global company revenues depends upon four commodities linked to deforestation: cattle products, palm oil, soy and timber products. That translates, it says, to $906 billion in annual turnover potentially at risk.

A view of recently land clearing for palm oil plantation of the peatland forest inside Singkil peat swamp Leuser ecosystem, habitat of Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) in Iemeudama village on November 13, 2016 in Trumon subdistrict, South Aceh, Aceh province, Indonesia. The Orangutans in Indonesia have been known to be on the verge of extinction as a result of deforestation and poaching. Indonesia approved palm oil concessions on nearly 15 million acres of peatlands over the past years and thousands of square miles have been cleared for plantations, including the lowland areas that are the prime habitat for orangutans. Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

“This $906 billion figure has been calculated by looking at the percentage of revenues publicly listed companies say is dependent on the commodities they reported on.

“The companies include big names, like Cargill, Kraft Heinz Company, Starbucks and Marks & Spencer, and global commodity traders Archer Daniels Midland and Bunge. CDP, formerly Carbon Disclosure Project, is an international, not-for-profit organization. Its new report Revenue at risk: why addressing deforestation is critical to business success analyzes data disclosed by 187 companies in 2016 – often for the first time – on their deforestation risk management strategies.

“Who is behind the report? Some 365 investors representing $22 trillion. Deforestation leads to some 15% of global greenhouse gas emissions, as Paul Simpson, CEO of CDP, points out in his foreword to the report. Addressing deforestation is therefore critical to delivering a sustainable post-2020 global economy.” –Dina Medland (Continue reading:  Deforestation: $906B At Risk Via ‘Domino Effect’ On The Supply Chain)

Eye on the Ball– #ClimateChange, #Biodiversity, #NatureConservation, & #SarahPalin

Nature Conservation

GarryRogersThe excellent article introduced below is about nature conservation from the human viewpoint.  The argument is that the current mass extinction of wild plants and animals has harmful consequences for the future of the human species.  It most certainly has, but the author’s desire to inform his audience misses its target because it gives a biased view of the problem. The article does not consider the rights of other species. This “homocentric” view of nature assumes that disappearance of other creatures is only important if it endangers humans.

Aldo Leopold and other conservationists realized that this viewpoint is unsustainable. Unless we accept the equality of all Earth’s species, including our own, our conservation efforts will always fail.  With its runaway enthusiasm for untested proposals, our species will take chances with the lives of other species. Experiments aimed only at benefiting our species, experiments that do not respect the rights of other species, experiments that will sometimes have unforeseen consequences, will gradually nibble away at nature until our ecosystems collapse and wash into the sea (carrying us with it).

Unless we begin to respect the rights of all species, we will exert constant damage on the Earth and ourselves.

 

Our real Sarah Palin nightmare: We debate sideshows and phony problems — while this very real threat looms undiscussed

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, right, endorses Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a rally at the Iowa State University, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, right, endorses Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a rally at the Iowa State University, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

“It’s an amazing fact that the contemporary world is marked by a growing number of problems that are genuinely global in scope. Some of these problems even have existential implications for the survival of human civilization — yet instead we spend too much time discussing smaller threats, including North Korea, ISIS, Oregon militias and even Sarah Palin. One such problem is anthropogenic climate change — a catastrophe whose effects are anticipated to be “severe,” “pervasive” and “irreversible.”

“But climate change isn’t the only problem of this sort. In fact, for many who spend their lives studying environmental issues, it can be frustrating to see climate change — a highly contentious issue among non-experts, despite a scientific consensus about its reality and causes — dominate the public discussion. The fact is that biodiversity loss constitutes an equally worrisome (albeit related) threat to the future of humanity.

“Consider some cold hard facts. According to the 3rd Global Biodiversity Report (GBO-3), the total population of vertebrates — a broad category that includes mammals, birds, reptiles, sharks, rays and amphibians — living within the tropics declined by a shocking 59% from 1970 to 2006. Take a moment to let this sink in. In only 36 years, more than half of the vertebrate population between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer disappeared.”— Read More: , Salon.

Links:

Population

Conservation

 

Why are Colorado wildlife biologists apologizing for the energy industry?

‘Just pointing fingers at the energy industry is not a helpful solution to this difficult issue’

FRISCO — “A recent study showing that energy development in northwest Colorado significantly affects wildlife habitat drew national attention, and a curious reaction from Colorado’s wildlife agency, which seemed to be apologizing on behalf of the energy industry.

“The study showed that the region’s dwindling mule deer population shies well away from active drilling, to a distance of at least 800 meters. Deer displayed more nuanced responses to other infrastructure, avoiding pads with active production and roads to a greater degree during the day than night.”  Sourced through Scoop.it from: summitcountyvoice.com

GR:  Deer and other wildlife are declining and yet the management plans for stopping the decline remain too sensitive to human desires to be effective.  Construction, livestock grazing, mining, logging, and recreation have to stop if we wish to save our animals and ecosystems.  Just say’in.

Do We Really Need “Hypoallergenic Parks”?

“Hypoallergenic parks: Coming soon?” That was the headline on the press release, and the specter of sanitized nature made me mutter “Oh, crap.” So I downloaded the study. It’s being published in the Journal of Environmental Quality, and it made me wonder, for the first time in my life, whether we might be taking this whole damned environmental quality thing a bridge too far.

“Let’s stipulate that we have already paved under much of the natural world to suit human needs, especially in and around cities, and further, that we often manipulate what’s left to our own purposes, and finally, that these changes almost always work to the detriment of the birds, butterflies, and other animals that once depended on these habitats. Is the logical conclusion that we now also need a war on trees that happen to cause hay fever?

“The study, by a team of Spanish researchers, looked at trees in Granada, a city widely admired for its abundance of handsomely-planted boulevards, parks, gardens, and other green spaces. But because of its Mediterranean climate and long growing season, Granada is also a hay fever hotspot, with almost 30 percent of residents saying they are allergic to pollen.”  Sourced through Scoop.it from: strangebehaviors.wordpress.com

GR:  I agree that we cannot view nature only in terms of its benefits or costs for humans.  That’s too narrow a view even for humans, and it certainly ignores the needs of animals.  It’s just this type of thinking that is behind the disappearance of over half of Earth’s wildlife.