50th UN Session of Commission on Population & Development

GR: The growing human population is the source of most of the environmental destruction that is threatening the biological diversity and stability of the Earth. Here’s some information from Joe Bish of the Population Media Center (PMC) that will help you stay updated on critical issues (Fertility projections). Bish is reporting on the latest United Nations nonsense about sustainable development.

Travel by train in India (anonymous).

“Welcome to Population Media Center’s Weekly News. Click here to review an on-line newspaper filled with population and sustainability related stories.They provide a good summary of international developments and population-related news-flow during the past week.

“It is debatable as to what was the biggest news in the field this week: the 50th session of the Commission on Population and Development was convened in New York City — and the current U.S. administration cut off American funding for UNFPA. Normally, I would say the latter was a much more meaningful news-item, after all, the cut-off of funds will lead to the suffering and death of multitudes of women and children. On the other hand, you will likely join me in disbelief and consternation to find the official news release from the UN (see below) has a headline that states “population… decline” is a key focus of the 50th session.

“Bear in mind that during the 5-day work week of proceedings at the UN, global population will have increased by roughly 1.1 million people. Also, you don’t need reminding that since the Commission was established in 1947, world population has risen by well over 5 billion people. Yet… “population… decline” is the headline?

“We all know what this headline is referring to are a score of countries that are thought to be experiencing natural decrease. These include Japan, Spain, Puerto Rico, Serbia, Portugal, Greece, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Ukraine, Romania, Moldova, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, Belarus, and Georgia. Nonetheless, while some attention may be required to help these countries adopt a sustainable economy that does not require perpetual population growth to function, surely it seems not quite right that the 50th session of the Commission is being dedicated to the relative distractions of aging and “population decline.” –Joe Bish

3 April 2017 – The United Nations advisory body on issues related to population and development today kicked off its annual session, with a focus on changing population age structures and sustainable development.
“Population ageing and population decline have now become key issues for a growing number of Member States,” Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs Wu Hongbo told the opening segment of the Commission on Population and Development’s fiftieth annual session, which will run at UN Headquarters through 7 April.
He also noted that with global fertility at, or even below, fertility [sic] level, international migration “is becoming the main driver of population change for a number of countries.” –United Nations (Continue:  PMC’s Weekly News: 50th Session of Commission on Population & Development).

100,000 may have died but there is still no justice over Indonesian air pollution

GR: No family should have to endure such heartbreak because some company is pursuing profits at all costs. The tragedy extends even farther than reported here. People can breath through a rag and clean their food. Wild animals can do neither. Moreover, the smoke is from burning wildlife habitat. It’s no surprise that the World Wildlife Fund reports global loss of 60% of all the Earth’s animals since 1970. The total loss is expected to reach 67% by 2020.

“It started with a mild cough. Muhanum Anggriawati was just 12 years old when the cough began, transforming within weeks into a violent hacking that brought up a yellowish-black liquid.

“At the end of last year, her father told an Indonesian court how she had been taken into hospital, and treated with oxygen therapy, then with a defibrillator. Nothing, however, had worked. After a week on a breathing machine, she died in the hospital, her lungs still full of the foul mucus.

“Anggriawati is believed to have been one of many victims of the haze, or air pollution, that regularly spreads across Indonesia because of the huge deforestation fires linked to palm oil and other agribusiness.

“The Global Fire Emissions Database reports that in 2015, fires in Indonesia generated about 600m tonnes of greenhouse gases, which is roughly equivalent to Germany’s entire annual output.

“The smoke contains dangerous chemicals such as carbon monoxide, ammonia and cyanide. A study by Harvard and Columbia universities revealed that the haze may have caused the premature deaths of more than 100,000 people in south-east Asia in 2015. The authors estimated that there were 91,000 deaths in Indonesia; 6,500 in Malaysia and 2,200 in Singapore.” –Elodie Aba and Bobbie Sta. Maria (More: 100,000 may have died but there is still no justice over Indonesian air pollution | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian.)

Managing the BLM: Please Help

GR:  The policy of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), “multiple use and sustained yield,” sounds great until you look at the results. Mining and mineral prospecting, cattle grazing, recreation, and energy transmission have led to invasions by alien plants and animals, soil erosion, increasing wildfires, and declining biodiversity. The BLM avoids conflicts with the profit goals of the companies that control our politicians. Thus, the agency responsible for more public land in the U. S. than any other does not hesitate to sacrifice the health and beauty of the land to avoid criticism from the resource harvesters that wish to use, and often abuse, the land. In fact, the BLM has a long history of anticipating the needs of private companies and adjusting polices to help them harvest the land.

As you will see in the item below taken from the Arizona section of the BLM website, BLM encourages public participation in formulating land-use plans. However, the agency often ignores public concerns when company profits are at stake. This might change if public participation grew as large as it has in North Dakota. So, follow the continue reading link at the end of the article and look for BLM public meetings in your area. And go.  Remember, “sustainable use” is meaningless if the use adds roads and depletes the habitat, soil, and wildlife. And remember, we don’t need no more stinking fossil fuels.

“The Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) Land Use Plans, called Resource Management Plans (RMPs), evaluate and guide the management of resources and uses on public lands over a fifteen to twenty year period. Using the principles of multiple use and sustained yield, BLM Arizona seeks to maximize resource values on public land for current and future generations, ensuring the health, diversity, and productivity of the public land.

“BLM Arizona manages approximately 12.2 million surface acres of public land, and realizes that public involvement is critical in the development and implementation of its RMPs. Throughout the planning process, the BLM uses a collaborative approach involving tribal, State and local governments, other federal agencies, and interested publics in addressing management goals for public land. When RMPs are ready for review and public comment, BLM Arizona makes copies available to field offices and on the Internet. New and revised RMPs are now being developed in the ePlanning database. We encourage you to get involved in the planning process to help determine how the public lands will be managed. Involvement by everyone, who is interested in the public lands, will help ensure that the best overall plan is developed.” –BLM (Continue reading:  Programs: Planning and NEPA: Plans in Development: Arizona | BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT)

Thirty-three Years of Growth in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona

Growth, The Destruction of Nature in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona

02-20050924-p1020497Click the link below to go to the Google Earth Engine for a 32-year aerial-photo time-lapse of the growth of Dewey-Humboldt (D-H) in central Arizona. The animation begins in 1984 and ends in 2016.  The later photos in the series are higher resolution than the early ones, but you can still track the changes from beginning to end.

https://earthengine.google.com/iframes/timelapse_player_embed.html#v=34.52835,-112.24596,11.467,latLng&t=1.80

Though citizen efforts have slowed D-H growth, there has nevertheless been a substantial loss of natural vegetation. The greatest losses have been in the upland shrubs and chaparral vegetation of the town’s foothills. Watch the animation for appearance of the Prescott Country Club and the developments in the Blue Hills on the west side of town and along Foothill Road in the east. Substantial chaparral losses are also occurring in the unincorporated areas east of D-H.

There have been no successful efforts by citizens to slow neighboring Prescott Valley’s growth. The greatest losses there have been in the desert grasslands east and north of town. Once occupied by herds of antelope and other wildlife, the Arizona Game and Fish Department has written off the area as a lost cause.

The Google Earth Engine works for any place on planet Earth.  Drag the scene to areas of interest and watch the time-lapse animation there.