Sharing the Earth

Half for Nature

Dr. Helen Kopnina (photo: Springer Nature)

As we age and grow more familiar with our surroundings, the limits of the Earth begin to appear through the clouds of our experience and reactions. When I think of the Voyager Golden Records travelling into the Cosmos for the past 43 years, I wonder if some alien species will one day trace humanity’s greetings back to a barren planet no longer wrapped in life and promise. In the linked article, Helen Kopnina and her coauthors gracefully lay out the mutually beneficial path we must follow to save our planet’s life and ourselves.

https://go.nature.com/2NxX2Cs

Header photo:  College of Natural Resources, UC Berkeley.

 

Legal Tools & Links For the Conservation of Nature

Globe on grassYesterday, a visitor sent an email containing corrections and additions for my Legal Tools & Links page. So much appreciated, I made the changes and checked a few other sites too. It occurred that the list needs something more helpful than alphabetization. Okay, that’s on my to-do list. Any suggestions would be most welcome (the image is from the scclegal website).

Thank you.

Garry

Expect the Best, Be Prepared for the Worst

How to Send a Finch Extinct

strange behaviors

Australia’s southern black-throated finch: Going, going …

This one caught my eye because it’s such a pretty bird, and because of the mindlessness with which Australia is letting human development drive it to extinction.

The state of Queensland and Australia’s federal government have allowed more than 1900 square miles of potential finch habitat to be cleared without anybody asking: Is this really a good idea? Almost 800 developments have been proposed and only one was turned down for its unacceptable impact on the finch, which has now vanished from 80 percent of its original habitat. Still in the works, five new coal mines in the last remaining high quality finch habitat.

It’s kind of amazing in a country that just this month is experiencing fish, wild horse, and bat die-offs  because of climate change.  (“Their brain just fries.“)

There’s a Senate hearing in Brisbane Friday on the…

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15 Reasons Why You Should Study Environmental Science

Motivation & Environment

We live in an age that has a lot environmental challenges threatening the existence of living and non-living things. This Earth in which we breathe, eat and live, is not as healthy as it was in the distant past; so the major reason why you should study environmental science is because it will make you more aware and sensitive about happenings in the Earth’s environment; furthermore, it’ll update you about the environmental issues affecting everything in it, and which may likely continue to do so throughout the lives of its inhabitants.

It’s understandable if I sound biased when I state that environmental science is the most important subject because it cuts across all humans and other living things in the world. It is important to understand how the Earth works, how our activities affect its life-supporting capability, and how we can reduce the negative environmental impact on it; nobody has…

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