About Garry Rogers

An advocate for wildlife and nature conservation, I write about plants, animals, and natural landscapes.  My experiences with the vegetation ecology of North American deserts, forests, and coasts have made it clear that disastrous changes are occurring. I write and blog to draw attention to what’s going on and encourage others to join in the defense of nature.

Experience

  • BRR Enterprises.– Partner
  • Research Associates.– Founder, CEO
  • University of Utah.– PhD Candidate, Teaching Fellow
  • InterScience, Inc. –Director
  • Columbia University in the City of New York. –Professor
  • U. S. Forest Service. –Senior Research Scientist
  • U. S. Justice Department. –Science Consultant
  • Academic Distributing, Inc. –Founder, CEO
  • Agua Fria Chamber of Commerce. –Founder, President
  • Agua Fria Open Space Alliance, Inc. –Founder, President
  • Southern Yavapai Water Users Association. –Founder, President
  • Universal Life Church. –Ordained Minister (non-religious weddings only)
  • Highlands Center for Nature Conservation. –Ants
  • Author. —Then & Now, Bibliography of Repeat Photography, Arizona Wildlife Notebook, The H. sapiens Problem, Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, Butterflies of Yavapai County, Arizona.

Poirot the Parrot

Trib Photo/Briana Lonas Children's author Garry Rogers reads from his book about an adventurous parrot during the Local Authors Book Festival in Prescott Valley.

Garry reading a Poirot story at the 2015 Prescott Valley Local Authors Book Festival (Trib photo/Briana Lonas).

When my daughter was small, I told her stories about a foolish young parrot named Poirot (Pwä-rōw).  A few years ago I began compiling a set of the stories for her and my son to read to their children.  I found that retelling the stories helped make them more interesting.  It is best to do this at bedtime when children will do anything to avoid going to sleep.  Here’s the link to a PDF copy of Bees and Birthday Cake–How Poirot Lost a Tail Feather.

 Garry Rogers Honors

More than just reporting my awards, I wish to honor the institutions that take time to evaluate the work of so many like me in an effort to encourage their productivity.

Kirkus Star: Awarded to books of exceptional merit.Kirkus Star awarded to Corr Syl the Warrior.  “A beautifully written novel that will captivate sci-fi fans of all ages.”  —Kirkus reviews. –June, 2013.

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OneBookAZ LogoCorr Syl the Warrior Winner of the Arizona State Library 2014 OneBookAZ Teen Literature Award.

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Award NM-AZ 2014 WinnerArizona Wildlife Notebook winner of the New Mexico–Arizona 2014 Book Awards

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 SigmaXi

SigmaXi The Scientific Research Society.  Elected to Full Membership (lifetime).

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1-PX Coll Alum Hall of Fame Medal 001

Phoenix College Alumni Hall of Fame – 2014.

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Recent Posts

Disappearing Wildlife and Nature Conservation

GR: This is an urgent message that everyone should receive: We must act to stop the global deterioration and loss of forests, shrublands, grasslands, soil, and wildlife. Human activities–plowing the land, cutting the forests, grazing the grassland, warming the air, and exposing soil to wind and water erosion–are destroying our planetary life-sustaining ecosystems. Over the 40-year period to 2012, more than half the animals on Earth disappeared. Unless we make an immediate and powerful response, vegetation and soil losses will continue until they strip the planet’s surface bare. Without soil, much of the Earth will become as lifeless as the moon. Barren and silent but for whispering wind, pockets of weeds, clouds of wildfire smoke, and the distant cries of a few remaining animals.

Bessie Parker farm, Leon, Iowa. The erosion in these fields has reduced the value of the farm to the point where all but 40 acres have been taken over for taxes. Erosion has not stopped. Cattle grazing and sporadic hay mowing will continue to expose soil (photo: public domain, U. S. National Archives).

The source of the information on wildlife decline is the World Wildlife Fund: “Global biodiversity is declining at an alarming rate, putting the survival of other species and our own future at risk. The latest edition of WWF’s Living Planet Report brings home the enormity of the situation – and how we can start to put it right. The Living Planet Index reveals that global populations of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles declined by 58 per cent between 1970 and 2012. We could witness a two-thirds decline in the half-century from 1970 to 2020 . . .”

Without soil, there will be no farms, freshwater will runoff to the sea, vegetation will disappear, and wildlife will die (photo © Kelly Sillaste / Getty Images / WWF).

Wildlife decline: Living Planet Report 2016 | WWF

  1. The Global Solution to Extinction – The New York Times 6 Replies
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