About Garry Rogers

An advocate for wildlife and nature conservation, I write about plants, animals, and natural landscapes.  My experiences with the vegetation ecology of North American deserts, forests, and coasts have made it clear that disastrous changes are occurring. I write and blog to draw attention to what’s going on and encourage others to join in the defense of nature. Here’s a summary of my curriculum vitae.

Experience

  • BRR Enterprises.– Partner
  • University of Utah.– PhD Candidate, Teaching Fellow
  • InterScience, Inc. –Director
  • Columbia University in the City of New York. –Professor, Department of Geography
  • U. S. Forest Service. –Senior Research Scientist
  • U. S. Justice Department. –Science Consultant
  • Academic Distributing, Inc. –Founder, CEO
  • Agua Fria Chamber of Commerce. –Founder, President
  • Agua Fria Open Space Alliance, Inc. –Founder, President
  • Southern Yavapai Water Users Association. –Founder, President
  • Universal Life Church. –Ordained Minister (non-religious weddings only)
  • Books and Monographs. —Then & Now, Bibliography of Repeat Photography, Arizona Wildlife Notebook, Vol I: The Vertebrates, Corr Syl the Warrior, Arizona Wildlife Notebook, Corr Syl the Terrible, Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, The H. sapiens Problem, Butterflies of Yavapai County, Arizona, Weeds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona. 

Poirot the Parrot

Trib Photo/Briana Lonas Children's author Garry Rogers reads from his book about an adventurous parrot during the Local Authors Book Festival in Prescott Valley.

Garry reading a Poirot story at the 2015 Prescott Valley Local Authors Book Festival (Trib photo/Briana Lonas).

When my daughter was small, I told her stories about a foolish young parrot named Poirot (Pwä-rōw).  A few years ago I began compiling a set of the stories for her and my son to read to their children.  I found that retelling the stories helped make them more interesting.  It is best to do this at bedtime when children will do anything to avoid going to sleep.  Here’s the link to a PDF copy of Bees and Birthday Cake–How Poirot Lost a Tail Feather.

 Garry Rogers Honors

More than just reporting my awards, I wish to honor the institutions that take time to evaluate the work of so many like me in an effort to encourage their productivity.

Kirkus Star: Awarded to books of exceptional merit.Kirkus Star awarded to Corr Syl the Warrior.  “A beautifully written novel that will captivate sci-fi fans of all ages.”  —Kirkus reviews. –June, 2013.

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OneBookAZ LogoCorr Syl the Warrior Winner of the Arizona State Library 2014 OneBookAZ Teen Literature Award.

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Award NM-AZ 2014 WinnerArizona Wildlife Notebook winner of the New Mexico–Arizona 2014 Book Awards

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 SigmaXi

SigmaXi The Scientific Research Society.  Elected to Full Membership (lifetime).

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1-PX Coll Alum Hall of Fame Medal 001

Phoenix College Alumni Hall of Fame – 2014.

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Recent Posts

Postscript: The Time is Growing Short

POSTCRIPT
I published the blog post below in 2017. It discusses a scientific analysis and climate-change warning published in the journal Nature.
The critical element of the scientists’ conclusion was the absolutely necessity to begin immediately reducing CO2 emissions. Progress was pinned to six milestones that had to be reached by 2020. Here we are in 2020. Unfortunately, global CO2 emissions increased in 2018 and 2019 and none of the six milestones was reached. Likewise, the other disasters I mentioned are continuing to accelerate. The likelihood that human civilization will continue to progress and flourish in years to come is perhaps exactly equal to the number of times “biodiversity” or “global wildlife extinction” has been mentioned in the Democratic presidential debates: Zero. But who knows? Perhaps this year’s weather will provoke a massive mobilization similar to what it took to combat the Nazis.

[Alfred E. Neuman said “What, me worry?” — perhaps he was our spokesperson after all, eh Joe?]

The 2017 Blog Post

GR [in 2017]:  An article from June, 2016 should be on everyone’s mind now. Here’s my discussion followed by a link to the article.

A group of scientists analyzed the sources of CO2 and the dynamic relationship between the quantity of CO2 in the atmosphere and global temperature to devise a global carbon budget they could use to assess the effect of timing of changes in CO2 emissions. The analysis enabled them to calculate the changes we must make to preserve a livable climate. You’ll have to read the article to see the individual sources of CO2 that must be adjusted. I wanted to mention the timing for the budget. The analysis shows that if CO2 emissions begin to fall immediately and reach zero in 30 years, we will remain within the global warming limits set by the Paris treaty. After the flat emissions of 2014, 2015, and 2016, the authors believed that the fall in emissions was ready to begin. This is good, because their budget shows that if we wait to 2020 to start tapering off CO2 production, we only get 20 years to reach zero emissions. If we wait to 2025, we get less than 10 years to reach zero. Transforming our energy use that quickly would be impossible.

SO, how are we doing. Six months after the analysis was published, we find that 2017 emissions have gone up, not down. Lot’s of positive changes have begun, but we have to wait to see what happens in 2018. If we begin to taper off CO2 emissions by 2020, we will have 20 years to reach zero emissions. I suggest you take a look at the six milestones the authors believe must be reached by 2020. Then you can monitor the world’s progress toward painful climate change (the Paris treaty) or disastrous climate change (with too many storms, fires, heat waves, and rising seas).

Climate change is just one of the approaching disasters. Human population and its impact is growing, wildlife species are going extinct at incredible rates, freshwater supplies are dropping, and toxic wastes are building up. If we can’t do much more than take our CO2 emissions to zero over the next 20 years, most of the diversity and beauty of life on Earth will disappear.

Christiana Figueres and colleagues set out a six-point plan for turning the tide of the world’s carbon dioxide by 2020. NATURE.COM
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