About Garry Rogers

An advocate for wildlife and nature conservation, I write about plants, animals, and natural landscapes.  My experiences with the vegetation ecology of North American deserts, forests, and coasts have made it clear that disastrous changes are occurring. I write and blog to draw attention to what’s going on and encourage others to join in the defense of nature.

Experience

  • BRR Enterprises.– Partner
  • Research Associates.– Founder, CEO
  • University of Utah.– PhD Candidate, Teaching Fellow
  • InterScience, Inc. –Director
  • Columbia University in the City of New York. –Professor
  • U. S. Forest Service. –Senior Research Scientist
  • U. S. Justice Department. –Science Consultant
  • Academic Distributing, Inc. –Founder, CEO
  • Agua Fria Chamber of Commerce. –Founder, President
  • Agua Fria Open Space Alliance, Inc. –Founder, President
  • Southern Yavapai Water Users Association. –Founder, President
  • Universal Life Church. –Ordained Minister (non-religious weddings only)
  • Highlands Center for Nature Conservation. –Ants
  • Author. —Then & Now, Bibliography of Repeat Photography, Arizona Wildlife Notebook, The H. sapiens Problem, Birds of Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, Butterflies of Yavapai County, Arizona.

Poirot the Parrot

Trib Photo/Briana Lonas Children's author Garry Rogers reads from his book about an adventurous parrot during the Local Authors Book Festival in Prescott Valley.

Garry reading a Poirot story at the 2015 Prescott Valley Local Authors Book Festival (Trib photo/Briana Lonas).

When my daughter was small, I told her stories about a foolish young parrot named Poirot (Pwä-rōw).  A few years ago I began compiling a set of the stories for her and my son to read to their children.  I found that retelling the stories helped make them more interesting.  It is best to do this at bedtime when children will do anything to avoid going to sleep.  Here’s the link to a PDF copy of Bees and Birthday Cake–How Poirot Lost a Tail Feather.

 Garry Rogers Honors

More than just reporting my awards, I wish to honor the institutions that take time to evaluate the work of so many like me in an effort to encourage their productivity.

Kirkus Star: Awarded to books of exceptional merit.Kirkus Star awarded to Corr Syl the Warrior.  “A beautifully written novel that will captivate sci-fi fans of all ages.”  —Kirkus reviews. –June, 2013.

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OneBookAZ LogoCorr Syl the Warrior Winner of the Arizona State Library 2014 OneBookAZ Teen Literature Award.

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Award NM-AZ 2014 WinnerArizona Wildlife Notebook winner of the New Mexico–Arizona 2014 Book Awards

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 SigmaXi

SigmaXi The Scientific Research Society.  Elected to Full Membership (lifetime).

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1-PX Coll Alum Hall of Fame Medal 001

Phoenix College Alumni Hall of Fame – 2014.

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Recent Posts

Some Weed Problems

Some Weed Problems Introduction

Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) by Walter J. Pilsak

We know and love (or, more commonly, hate) weeds for their ability to spread to and cover bare soil exposed by fires, floods, plows, and garden spades. Like band-aids on skinned knees, weeds protect soil from erosion by wind and water. This is good, and should be good enough for us to be selective (not stereotyping) in our attitude toward weeds. But it isn’t. The reason for our persistent hatred is that weeds can compete with and replace crop and garden plants, they can replace native vegetation, and they can block vision and even travel. And, as you will see in the first article below, some weeds have toxic chemicals for defense and aggression and can inflict serious injury to grazers or innocent passersby.

Giant Hogweed (by Appaloosa)

People used to use the techniques of organic gardening to prevent and eradicate weeds. However, in the middle of the last century, science gave us herbicides, chemicals that interfere with weed growth and reproduction. What a pleasure to wave our spray wand over weeds and watch them shrivel and die. For decades, agricultural scientists have improved herbicides. They have even paired them with genetically modified crop plants that aren’t hurt by the magic spray that kills invading weeds.

Herbicides disrupt nature and cause cancer in humans. The chemical industry claims that reduced cost of food production justifies herbicide use. However, herbicides are growing stronger and farmers are applying them more heavily. This increases the harm to nature and human health.

Weeds are not defenseless against herbicides. Most of them produce seeds for the next generation in a single year, and this allows natural selection of herbicide-resistant plants within a few years. As described in the second article below, weed resistance is exceeding the power of the herbicides. As the gap between herbicide efficacy and weed resistance grows, farmers will return to the old organic gardening techniques. Though this will be less harmful to nature and people, it will increase the cost of farmed produce. Consequently, we may have to reduce meat production, a major consumer of farm crops, and, eventually, we will have to reduce human population size.

The articles below include recent discussions of weed problems.

Some Weed Problems References

Click for more on weeds.

  1. Conservation Easement for Coldwater Farm 3 Replies
  2. Livestock and Humans Have Replaced Most Wild Animals 3 Replies
  3. Toxic Pesticide Use in National Wildlife Refuges 9 Replies