Arizona Bat Update–November 2013

By Garry Rogers

Arizona Bat Peril Increases

Big Brown Bat from Smithsonian North American Mammals

The most important change since my last post about Arizona bats is the increased risk of white-nose syndrome.  The disease continues to spread west from its point of introduction on the U. S. Atlantic coast despite research and quarantine efforts.  In September, 2013, researchers confirmed the disease had reached Oklahoma and South Dakota (http://whitenosesyndrome.org/resources/map).

The entities that gain most from
bat extinction are insecticide producers.

Arizona Bat Numbers

According to the October 10 report by the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), there are 33 Arizona species.  All but two are of concern or of possible long-term concern.  One, the Lesser Long-nosed Bat, is on the ESA endangered species list.

  • World:  1200+
  • United States:  45
  •  Arizona:  33
  •  Arizona bat species of concern:  31 (94%)
  • ESA Arizona bats listed endangered:  1 (and one partial)
  • ESA Arizona bats of concern:  15

Arizona Bat References

Conservation Status Symbol Definitions (from AZGFD)

Symbols used by Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD).  I added question marks to two undefined symbols.

  • S1         Critically Imperiled: Extremely rare or some factor(s) is making the species especially vulnerable to extirpation.  Typically 5 or fewer locations or very few remaining individuals (<1,000).
  • S2         Imperiled:  Rare or some factor(s) is making the species very vulnerable to extirpation. Typically 6 to 20 occurrences or few remaining individuals (1,000 to 3,000).
  • S3         Vulnerable:  Rare or found only in a restricted range (even if abundant at some locations), or because of other factors making it vulnerable to extirpation.  Typically 21 to 100 occurrences or between 3,000 and 10,000 individuals.
  • S4         Apparently Secure:  Uncommon but not rare, and usually widespread.  Usually more than 100 occurrences* and more than 10,000 individuals.  Possible long-term concern.
  • S5         Secure:  Common, widespread, and abundant.  Safe under present conditions.  Typically with considerably more than 100 locations and more than 10,000 individuals.
  • S#S#:   Indicates the range of uncertainty about exact status (e.g., S3S4).
  • E:          Exotic Origin:  Species is not native to AZ.

Symbols Used for the Endangered Species Act (ESA)
(US Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service)

  • LE         Listed Endangered:  Imminent jeopardy of extinction.
  • PS         Partial Status:  Listed Endangered or Threatened, but not in entire range.
  • No        (No Status) Certain populations of this taxon do not have designated status (check with state or regional USFWS office for details about which populations have designated status).
  • PE         Proposed Endangered
  • SC         Species of Concern:  Describes the entire realm of taxa whose conservation status may be of concern to the US Fish and Wildlife Service, but does not have official federal status.

A R I Z O N A   B A T S

SCIENTIFIC NAME

COMMON NAME

AZ

ESA

Antrozous pallidus

Pallid Bat

S4

Choeronycteris mexicana

Mexican Long-tongued Bat

S3

SC

Corynorhinus townsendii

Townsend’s Big-eared Bat

S3S4

No

Corynorhinus townsendii pallescens

Pale Townsend’s Big-eared Bat

S3S4

SC

Enchisthenes hartii

Velvety Fruit-eating Bat

SA?

Eptesicus fuscus

Big Brown Bat

S4S5

Euderma maculatum

Spotted Bat

S2S3

SC

Eumops perotis

Western Bonneted Bat

S3

Eumops perotis californicus

Greater Western Bonneted Bat

S3

SC

Eumops underwoodi

Underwood’s Bonneted Bat

S1

SC

Idionycteris phyllotis

Allen’s Lappet-browed Bat

S2S3

SC

Lasionycteris noctivagans

Silver-haired Bat

S3S4

Lasiurus blossevillii

Western Red Bat

S3

Lasiurus cinereus

Hoary Bat

S4

No

Lasiurus xanthinus

Western Yellow Bat

S2S3

Leptonycteris curasoae

Southern Long-nosed Bat

S2

PS

Leptonycteris curasoae yerbabuenae

Lesser Long-nosed Bat

S2S3

LE

Leptonycteris nivalis

Mexican Long-nosed Bat

SP?

Macrotus californicus

California Leaf-nosed Bat

S3

SC

Mormoops megalophylla

Ghost-faced Bat

SA?

Myotis auriculus

Southwestern Myotis

S3

Myotis californicus

California Myotis

S4

Myotis ciliolabrum

Western Small-footed Myotis

S3S4

SC

Myotis evotis

Long-eared Myotis

S3

SC

Myotis occultus

Arizona Myotis

S3

SC

Myotis thysanodes

Fringed Myotis

S3S4

SC

Myotis velifer

Cave Myotis

S3S4

SC

Myotis volans

Long-legged Myotis

S3S4

SC

Myotis yumanensis

Yuma Myotis

S3S4

SC

Nyctinomops femorosaccus

Pocketed Free-tailed Bat

S3

Nyctinomops macrotis

Big Free-tailed Bat

S3

SC

Parastrellus hesperus

Canyon Bat

S5

Tadarida brasiliensis

Brazilian Free-tailed Bat

S3S4

2 thoughts on “Arizona Bat Update–November 2013

  1. Pingback: Arizona Wildlife in Danger | The Blog Farm

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