The Swiss company hoping to capture 1% of global CO2 emissions by 2025 #DAC

GR:  I would prefer to have entrepreneurs work first on replacing fossil fuels with solar collectors, however carbon capture (CC) has an obvious role to play in dealing with our climate emergency. And why wouldn’t we want to clean our atmosphere? However, it isn’t comforting that some see CC as an alternative to cutting emissions.

“On the roof of a waste incinerator outside Zurich, the Swiss firm Climeworks has built the world’s first commercial plant to suck CO2 directly from the air.

“Climeworks says that its direct air capture (DAC) process – a form of negative emissions often considered too expensive to be taken seriously – costs $600 per tonne of CO2 today. This is partly covered by selling the CO2 to a nearby fruit and vegetable grower for use in its greenhouse.

“Climeworks hopes to get this down to $100/tCO2 by 2025 or 2030. It aims to be capturing 1% of global CO2 emissions each year by 2025.

“Carbon Brief travelled to the opening of the plant and interviewed co-founder Christoph Gebald to find out more about Climeworks’ ambitions, how the technology works and how it might contribute to global climate goals.” –Simon Evans (The Swiss company hoping to capture 1% of global CO2 emissions by 2025 | Carbon Brief)

Climate Change Facts & Figures

Here’s an excellent video/graph showing atmospheric CO2 changes through time.

The next video shows how global CO2 levels change around the world.

 

 

 

 

1980 View of CO2 and Global Warming–Must-See Video

Global Warming in 1980

This video gives insight to the progress of science on this issue.  Must see.

Go here for the latest on global warming and climate change.

Benefits of Removing Livestock from Rangelands to Sequester Carbon

f623b855-d229-4a32-abb2-770f8b14a604George Wuerthner:  “Rangelands make up a large proportion of the Earth’s surface, and the soils hold a significant amount of sequestered carbon. Rangelands are estimated to contain more than one-third of the world’s above and below ground carbon reserves.[i] As a consequence, there is interest in determining the potential for soil carbon sequestration in rangeland soils, and whether livestock grazing helps or hinders this sequestration.

“Given the existing condition of many rangelands, the biggest concern is maintaining current carbon, and avoiding losses through soil erosion, degradation of plant productivity and other changes that lead to soil carbon losses. In other words, the best way to reduce CO2 emissions from rangelands globally is to reduce rangeland degradation. Since livestock grazing is frequently the major source of rangeland degradation, a reduction in grazing pressure, can in many ecosystems, potentially preserve more soil carbon”  Source: www.thewildlifenews.com.

GR:  Excellent article.  Cites evidence showing that livestock grazing reduces soil CO2.  Moreover, domestic grazers remove plants that wildlife need, and they damage soil microorganisms that enrich and stabilize the soil and help block weed invasions.