Mass Wildlife Poisoning in Limpopo National Park

GR:  Lion bones?  Are ignorant people of Asia the most deadly threat to lions and rhinos? Do they also crave Panda and Snow Leopard body parts?  What about American Mountain Lions?  Ranchers of the western U. S. love to kill Mountain Lions.  Let’s hope they don’t start selling the bones to Asians.

Lion remains left at the scene of a wildlife poisoning in Limpopo National Park, Oct. 10, 2016 (Photo by Rae Kokes)

“CAPE TOWN, South Africa, October 22, 2016 (ENS) – The ongoing Asian demand for lion bones has led to a wildlife poisoning in the Limpopo National Park, just over the Mozambican border from South Africa’s Kruger National Park.

“A mere two kilometers from the Machampane tourist camp, a research team from the Limpopo Transfrontier Predator Project came across the carcasses of two nyala, a warthog and an impala laced with what they describe as a black granular poison.

“Lying nearby were the bodies of two lions, 51 vultures, three fish eagles, a yellow-billed kite and a giant eagle owl. There was evidence of a leopard but its body was not found.” – Mass Wildlife Poisoning in Limpopo National Park | ENS

Bat-hawk – We own the Night

 

“Whether you view wildlife as a resource or an elemental responsibility of our very humanity, it is under threat. And nowhere is this threat more evident than across the grasslands and forests of Africa where iconic species such as Elephant and Rhino are under threat.
This threat is intensifying as African development stutters, populations grow and Asian demand increases. The result of these factors and modern communications is a new type of organized crime that connects this demand to communities surrounding parks and reserves.
Attention is needed at the market end of this chain and in the middle sections of transit. The new UAV technologies however presents a very real and immediate opportunity to tackle this problem at the source. Bathawk Recon is a practical focused tool to do just that.”

Source: www.bat-hawkrecon.com

GR:  This private start-up company is offering wildlife monitoring services aimed at preserving African wildlife.  As clearly stated on the website, monitoring is only one part of a complex problem.  Let’s offer what support we can, and hope the company succeeds.  We need more businesses that contribute to general goals.

Are Namibia’s Rhinos Now Under Siege?

GR:  Nowhere is safe for rhinos. Once intelligence arose alone without the guidance of wisdom, most of Earth’s species were doomed. Can our species survive when only the toughest ruderals remain? Perhaps we will die or send a small colony into space. Either way, evolution could once again begin to recreate the biological riches it held when we appeared. Probably not. Why go to space when we can cover Earth with solar cells, wind turbines, hydro-generators, and of course, hydroponic greenhouses. With only small adjustments, our current non-sapient behavioral systems will survive.

strange behaviors

Early this year in The New York Times, I wrote an op-ed in praise of Namibia’s work in restoring populations of endangered black rhinos and, more important, in avoiding the poaching nightmare taking place next door in South Africa (on track to lose 1100 rhinos this year).  Here’s part of that piece:

Daniel Alfeus //Hawaxab-- aka Boxer Daniel Alfeus //Hawaxab– aka Boxer

Namibia is just about the only place on earth to have gotten conservation right for rhinos and, incidentally, a lot of other wildlife. Over the past 20 years, it has methodically repopulated one area after another as its rhino population has steadily increased. As a result, it is now home to 1,750 of the roughly 5,000 black rhinos surviving in the wild … In neighboring South Africa, government officials stood by haplessly as poachers slaughtered almost a thousand rhinos last year alone. Namibia lost just two.

But a new report says the…

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Wildlife decline: Why does biodiversity matter anyway? – Christian Science Monitor

Half of the planet’s wildlife populations suffered severe decline between 1970 and 2010, according to a new report from the WWF. So what does dwindling biodiversity mean for us?

Source: www.csmonitor.com

GR:  As biodiversity declines, the Earth’s carrying capacity, its ability to produce renewable resources, declines. Scientists are already telling us that the growing human population has exceeded the Earth’s carrying capacity.  What motivates our leaders to continue with development and “progress” when they surely know what is happening? What should we do?